Aerospace Legacy Foundation

Your portal to America's aerospace history

Aerospace Legacy Foundation (ALF) is a community based non-profit organization (501c3) including aerospace retirees and the public at large. Preserving Southern California's Aerospace and Aviation History including Downey's aerospace legacy.

North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletins

Erik Simonsen & Bob Hoover  

Erik Simonsen & Bob Hoover

 

NAA Bald Eagles Luncheon 2015

The North American Way

 

North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletins

An Extensive History of North American Aviation Compiled by Ed Rusenik and the NAA Bald Eagles Staff

 

2000-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2000-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2001-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2001-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2001-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2001-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2002-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2002-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2002-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2002-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2003-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2003-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2003-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2003-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2004-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2004-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2004-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2004-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD only

2005-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2005-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2005-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2005-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin  DVD Only

2006-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD Only

2006-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin DVD only

2006-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2006-4_Winter  North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2007-1_Spring   North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2007-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2007-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2007-4_Winter   North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2008-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2008-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2008-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2008-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2009-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2009-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2009-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2009-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2010-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2010-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2010-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2010-4_Winter   North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin 

2011-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2011-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2011-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2011-4_Winter North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2012-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2012-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2012-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2012-4_Winter North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin  

2013-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2013-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2013-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2013-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2014-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin   

2014-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2014-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2014-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2015-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2015-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2015-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2015-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin 

2016-1_Spring    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2016-2_Summer    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2016-3_Fall    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

2016-4_Winter    North American Aviation Bald Eagles Retiree Bulletin

X-15

North American Aviation-  By Sam Gnerre

"Incorporated on Dec. 6, 1928, North American Aviation’s formation followed the founding of the Boeing Company in 1916 and Douglas Aircraft in 1921. For its first few years, North American operated as a holding company, owning parts of many other aviation firms, including Douglas and General Aviation Manufacturing Corp. in Dundalk, Maryland.

In 1934, federal antitrust legislation required that the company give up its holdings in other aircraft companies. At that point, under engineer Dutch Kindelberger and designers Lee Atwater and J.S. Smithson, North American became an aviation manufacturer, moving into General Aviation’s plant at Dundalk.

Its stay there would be temporary. After the company won its first airplane contract for 42 NA-16 trainers in 1935, Kindelberger began moving North American’s manufacturing operations west. He built temporary quarters in El Segundo near the southeast corner of Los Angeles Municipal Airport, more than a decade before it became Los Angeles International Airport. The company rented 20 acres there for $600 a month. A permanent factory was finished on the site and occupied in January 1936, with 250 employees.

The NA-16 trainer, the first U.S. military plane to have an official model number, which would evolve into the BT-9 and then the AT-6 Texan, became an important aircraft in the training of American and British pilots. The company focused on such smaller planes at first, choosing not to compete with larger operations which could produce bigger, multi-engine planes.

These trainers became essential with the outbreak of World War II and the resultant need to train thousands of men quickly to become pilots. By the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, North American’s employment had risen to 23,000 people, and it was producing more than 300 aircraft per month". More here

Lee Atwood and Dutch Kindelberger

"The B-25 became famous when Col. Jimmy Doolittle (below) used them in his famous raid on Tokyo on April 18, 1942. Immortalized in the book and film “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo,” The Doolittle raid was the first U.S. air attack on the Japanese mainland and was an important morale booster early in the war effort."  Sam Gnerre

Kindelberger and Gen. Jimmy Doolittle

"Perhaps the company’s most outstanding wartime achievement was the development of the P-51 Mustang fighter. The plane grew out of Great Britain’s desire to purchase more P-40 Flying Tiger fighters from the U.S.

Lee Atwood convinced the British that North American could provide it with an even better fighter. A prototype of the proposed new design was rushed into production and first flew on Oct. 26, 1940. Britain had the planes in service by April 1941. Its first engine had performance problems, but once Rolls Royce engines began to be used in the P-51s, their superior performance made them one of the most important Allied weapons of the war. By war’s end, more than 5,000 P-51s were in service for the U.S.

"...The company turned out more than 40,000 airplanes during the war, including 9,498 B-25 Mitchell bombers, 15,586 P-51 Mustangs, and 15,498 trainers of various types. North American built 14 percent of all aircraft produced by U.S. manufacturers for the war effort.

The firm’s orders dropped off rapidly after the war ended, causing it to close its plants in Kansas City and Dallas. North American engineers already had been working with the new jet engine technology, and now that effort moved forward quickly with the company producing a variety of postwar jet fighter designs.

The company hit the jackpot with the F-86 Sabre Jet (below), the Air Force’s first swept-wing fighter jet. Its first test flight was in 1947, and it went into production in 1948. It would become the premier fighter plane of the Korean War, which began in 1950. North American expanded again, ramping up production in El Segundo and building plants in Downey and Columbus, Ohio to keep up with demand." Sam Gnerre-South Bay Daily breeze

F-86 Sabre        Image- Scott Germain

F-86 Sabre        Image- Scott Germain

The High and the Mighty

From the Mustang to the Sabre Jet, from the Apollo spacecraft to the B-I bomber, North American Aviation left a lasting legacy of aerospace excellence

From the Boeing Website

By Mike Lombardi and Erik Simonsen

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The Aerospace Legacy Foundation

Preserving Our Past, Focusing On The Future