Aerospace Legacy Foundation

Your portal to America's aerospace history

Aerospace Legacy Foundation (ALF) is a community based non-profit organization (501c3) including aerospace retirees and the public at large. Preserving Southern California's Aerospace and Aviation History including Downey's aerospace legacy.

Preserving Our Past- Focusing On The Future

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In the news...and selected stories

 

 

Hypersonic

An artist’s rendering shows what a hypersonic missile could look like as it travels along the edge of Earth's atmosphere. Raytheon is developing hypersonic weapons under several U.S. Department of Defense contracts. Image- Raytheon

Raytheon Co. in Tucson has won a $63.3 million military contract to continue development work on its hypersonic weapons program.

Raytheon (NYSE: RTN) has invested more than $100 million in hypersonic technologies for the U.S. Department of Defense, and has a number of hypersonic programs, said Thomas Bussing, vice president of Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems.

This new contract is for the Tactical Boost Glide hypersonic weapons program, a joint effort with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force, with most of the work being done in Tucson, Bussing said.

The glider, which is a weapon itself, is boosted above the atmosphere to skip off the upper atmosphere and continue flying at great distances and at speeds greater than Mach 5 until it gets to its target, he said.

“It’s much like a stone on a pond,” Bussing said. “This can get there extremely quickly. Speed helps you from your ability to counter threats.” Source- https://www.bizjournals. com

Space X- Future Unlimited

Below- After making 18 orbits of Earth since its launch early Saturday morning, the Crew Dragon spacecraft successfully attached to the International Space Station's Harmony module forward port via "soft capture" at 5:51 a.m. EST while the station was traveling more than 250 miles over the Pacific Ocean, just north of New Zealand. NASA/ Space X

Above- After making 18 orbits of Earth since its launch early Saturday morning, the Crew Dragon spacecraft successfully attached to the International Space Station’s Harmony module forward port via “soft capture” at 5:51 a.m. EST while the station was traveling more than 250 miles over the Pacific Ocean, just north of New Zealand. As the spacecraft approached the space station, it demonstrated its automated control and maneuvering capabilities by arriving in place at about 492 feet (150 meters) away from the orbital laboratory then reversing course and backing away from the station to 590 feet (180 meters) before the final docking sequence from about 65 feet (20 meters) away. The Crew Dragon used the station’s new international docking adapter for the first time since astronauts installed it during a spacewalk in August 2016, following its delivery to the station in the trunk of a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft on its ninth commercial resupply services mission. For the Demo-1 mission, Crew Dragon is delivering more than 400 pounds of crew supplies and equipment to the space station. A lifelike test device named Ripley also is aboard the spacecraft, outfitted with sensors to provide data about potential effects on humans traveling in Crew Dragon. Courtesy- NASA/Space X

The Time Machine


Land on the Moon 7-21-1969

Land on the Moon 7-21-1969

‘The Eagle Has Landed’ proclaims the front page of The Washington Post on July 21, 1969. Photograph taken by Jack Weir of his daughter.




Orion is coming

Images- NASA

Orion is here

Image- NASA

Returning to the Moon... to Stay

Artist's concept of the Orion spacecraft

Images NASA/Lockheed Martin

Above- The Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is a NASA spacecraft designed to take a crew of up to six Astronauts to destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit including the Moon, Mars and Asteroids.

Below- The Orion crew module receives propulsive support from the Service Module for the majority of the mission.

Images NASA/Lockheed Martin

Below- Orion-Structure

Below- Forward Bulkhead, Aft Bulkhead & Barrel, Backbone Structure

Below- Orion Backshell Install. Images NASA/Lockheed Martin

Above- Click image for Orion mission specs and info.

Above- Click image for Orion mission specs and info.


Mars likely to have enough oxygen to support life: study

Above- The new research was made possible by the discovery by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover of manganese oxides (AFP Photo/HO)

Paris (AFP) - Salty water just below the surface of Mars could hold enough oxygen to support the kind of microbial life that emerged and flourished on Earth billions of years ago, researchers reported Monday.

In some locations, the amount of oxygen available could even keep alive a primitive, multicellular animal such as a sponge, they reported in the journal Nature Geosciences.

"We discovered that brines" -- water with high concentrations of salt -- "on Mars can contain enough oxygen for microbes to breathe," said lead author Vlada Stamenkovic, a theoretical physicist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

"This fully revolutionises our understanding of the potential for life on Mars, today and in the past," he told AFP.

Up to now, it had been assumed that the trace amounts of oxygen on Mars were insufficient to sustain even microbial life. "We never thought that oxygen could play a role for life on Mars due to its rarity in the atmosphere, about 0.14 percent," Stamenkovic said.

By comparison, the life-giving gas makes up 21 percent of the air we breathe. On Earth, aerobic -- that is, oxygen breathing -- life forms evolved together with photosynthesis, which converts CO2 into O2. The gas played a critical role in the emergence of complex life, notable after the so-called Great Oxygenation Event some 2.35 billion years ago.

But our planet also harbours microbes -- at the bottom of the ocean, in boiling hotsprings -- that subsist in environments deprived of oxygen. "That's why -- whenever we thought of life on Mars -- we studied the potential for anaerobic life," Stamenkovic.

Marlowe HOOD,AFP . More Here 




Voyager 2

Voyager 2 is a space probe launched by NASA on August 20, 1977, to study the outer planets. Part of the Voyager program, it was launched 16 days before its twin, Voyager 1, on a trajectory that took longer to reach Jupiter and Saturn but enabled further encounters with Uranus and Neptune

“NASA's Voyager 2 probe, currently on a journey toward interstellar space, has detected an increase in cosmic rays that originate outside our solar system. Launched in 1977, Voyager 2 is a little less than 11 billion miles (about 17.7 billion kilometers) from Earth, or more than 118 times the distance from Earth to the Sun.

Since 2007 the probe has been traveling through the outermost layer of the heliosphere -- the vast bubble around the Sun and the planets dominated by solar material and magnetic fields. Voyager scientists have been watching for the spacecraft to reach the outer boundary of the heliosphere, known as the heliopause. Once Voyager 2 exits the heliosphere, it will become the second human-made object, after Voyager 1, to enter interstellar space.

Since late August, the Cosmic Ray Subsystem instrument on Voyager 2 has measured about a 5 percent increase in the rate of cosmic rays hitting the spacecraft compared to early August. The probe's Low-Energy Charged Particle instrument has detected a similar increase in higher-energy cosmic rays.

Cosmic rays are fast-moving particles that originate outside the solar system. Some of these cosmic rays are blocked by the heliosphere, so mission planners expect that Voyager 2 will measure an increase in the rate of cosmic rays as it approaches and crosses the boundary of the heliosphere.” NASA/JPL


Image- NASA


Image- NASA


hanslodge clipart

hanslodge clipart



 Decommissioning the Space Shuttles

From The Atlantic


An employee guides a replica shuttle main engine toward installation on space shuttle Discovery, on December 5, 2011. ALAN TAYLOR MAR 28, 2012 35 PHOTOS IN FOCUS

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers disconnect the remote manipulator system, or RMS, from space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay, on June 15, 2011. ALAN TAYLOR MAR 28, 2012 35 PHOTOS IN FOCUS.

Read the full article and see all of the incredible images! “Decommissioning the Space Shuttles”

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Space Shuttle Page


What is TESS?

Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

"The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is the next step in the search for planets outside of our solar system, including those that could support life. The mission will find exoplanets that periodically block part of the light from their host stars, events called transits. TESS will survey 200,000 of the brightest stars near the sun to search for transiting exoplanets. The mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than April 16, 2018, and no later than June 2018". The Full Story 


100_5059 Downey Studios crop.jpg

Productions shot at Downey Studios

By the way- Downey Studios succeeded Rockwell/Boeing at 12214 Lakewood Blvd. in Downey, CA. The area is now the Promenade of Downey.


 

Visit Our Apollo History Gallery

Click Image

Above- c1966 Apollo 104 (6-30-68) chart conference room in Downey, CA.  Image- Anthony Vidana

Above- c1966 Apollo 104 (6-30-68) chart conference room in Downey, CA. Image- Anthony Vidana

1966-1967 Test supervisors -Senior engineers meeting. North American Aviation Space Division in Downey, CA.  Image- Anthony Vidana

1966-1967 Test supervisors -Senior engineers meeting. North American Aviation Space Division in Downey, CA. Image- Anthony Vidana

8-18, 1966 Apollo 1 Crew at Downey . North American Aviation. Astronaut Gus Grissom in spacesuit.  Image- Anthony Vidana

8-18, 1966 Apollo 1 Crew at Downey . North American Aviation. Astronaut Gus Grissom in spacesuit. Image- Anthony Vidana

 

NASA STS Recordation Oral History Project

"This effort involved the collection of history from key individuals formerly and currently associated with the agency’s Space Shuttle Program (SSP), focusing on the Space Shuttle Orbiter and its related components. These interviews include information on a number of Space Shuttle Program aspects from concept development to retirement, and focus on design, hardware evolution, and changes in response to the two Space Shuttle accidents."

Edited Oral History Transcripts Here        

List of Oral History Project Participants
through September 30, 2016
.PDF

List of Oral History Project Participants- STS Recordation .PDF 

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Southern California / America's Aviation and Aerospace History