Aerospace Legacy Foundation

Your portal to America's aerospace history

Aerospace Legacy Foundation (ALF) is a community based non-profit organization (501c3) including aerospace retirees and the public at large. Preserving Southern California's Aerospace and Aviation History including Downey's aerospace legacy.

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The Orion spacecraft will take us to the Moon and beyond. NASA

The Orion spacecraft will take us to the Moon and beyond. NASA

NASA Orion Spacecraft That Will Bring Humans to Mars

Will Undergo Moon Test Mission in 2019

Dana Dovey, Newsweek Fri, Nov 3

"NASA is planning to take humans back to the Moon—something that has not been done since 1972. The new Orion spacecraft was built to explore the moon, Mars and beyond, but before taking humans on these exploratory missions, the brand new ship needs to be tested. NASA has now officially scheduled the date for Orion’s first human-less trip around the moon and back for 2019, a feat that will take humankind one giant leap closer (to quote a famous moon walker) to our Mission To Mars.

The test trip, called Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), will take the spacecraft in a lunar orbit around the moon, just a tiny bit further than the Apollo went when it touched down on the moon 48 years ago. At its peak, Orion will be 270,000 miles away from Earth, Space .com  reported. Although spacecrafts not built to support a human crew have traveled further into space, this distance will be the furthest that a crew-capable ship has ever been. 

During EM-1, Orion will travel to the moon and back in just 26 days. This short trip includes four days to travel from Earth to the moon, a week in an elliptical orbit around the moon, and then another four days to return, NASA reports. The launch will take place at the Kennedy Space Station in Florida. After its time in space, Orion will land in the Pacific ocean near California where it will be picked up by a recovery ship." The Full Story

 

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Remembering the Space Shuttle Orbiter

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Space Shuttle orbiter rescue scenario. Image- NASA

Space Shuttle orbiter rescue scenario. Image- NASA

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Space Shuttle artwork from Rockwell, 1976. NASA

Space Shuttle artwork from Rockwell, 1976. NASA

"NASA'S AMBITION IN 1971 was to build a fully reusable Space Shuttle which it could operate much as an airline operates its airplanes. The typical fully reusable Shuttle design in play in 1971 included a large Booster and a smaller Orbiter (image at top of post), each of which would carry a crew.

The Booster's rocket motors would ignite on the launch pad, drawing liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen propellants from integral internal tanks. At the edge of space, its propellants depleted, the Booster would release the Orbiter. It then would turn around, reenter the dense part of Earth's atmosphere, deploy air-breathing jet engines, and fly under power to a runway at its launch site. Because it would return to its launch site, NASA dubbed it the "Flyback Booster." It would then taxi or be towed to a hanger for minimal refurbishment and preparation for its next launch.

The Space Shuttle Orbiter, meanwhile, would arc up and away from the Booster. After achieving a safe separation distance, it would ignite its rocket motors to place itself into Earth orbit. After accomplishing its mission, it would fire its motors to slow down and reenter Earth's atmosphere, where it would deploy jet engines and fly under power to a runway landing. As in the case of the Booster, the Orbiter would need minimal refurbishment before it was launched again." Courtesy- Wired .com More here...

MAGE NASA NORTH AMERICAN ROCKWELL GENERAL DYNAMICS.

MAGE NASA NORTH AMERICAN ROCKWELL GENERAL DYNAMICS.

THE REUSABLE BOOSTER LANDS ON A RUNWAY LESS THAN AN HOUR AFTER LAUNCH FROM A NEARBY LAUNCH PAD. IMAGE NASA NORTH AMERICAN ROCKWELL GENERAL DYNAMICS

THE REUSABLE BOOSTER LANDS ON A RUNWAY LESS THAN AN HOUR AFTER LAUNCH FROM A NEARBY LAUNCH PAD. IMAGE NASA NORTH AMERICAN ROCKWELL GENERAL DYNAMICS

REUSABLE SPACE SHUTTLE WITH REUSABLE ORBITER, TWIN REUSABLE SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS, AND EXPENDABLE EXTERNAL TANK. IMAGE NASA-MCDONNELL DOUGLAS-TRW.

REUSABLE SPACE SHUTTLE WITH REUSABLE ORBITER, TWIN REUSABLE SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS, AND EXPENDABLE EXTERNAL TANK. IMAGE NASA-MCDONNELL DOUGLAS-TRW.

"Unlike an expendable launcher - for example, the Saturn V moon rocket - a fully reusable Space Shuttle would not discard spent parts downrange of its launch site as it climbed to Earth orbit. This meant that, in theory, any place that could host an airport might become a Space Shuttle launch and landing site.

NASA managers felt no need for a new launch and landing site; they already had two at their disposal. They planned to launch and land the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Florida's east coast and Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), California. Nevertheless, for a time in 1971-1972, a NASA board reviewed some 150 candidate Shuttle launch and landing sites in 40 of the 50 U.S. states. A few were NASA-selected candidates, but most were put forward by members of Congress, state and local politicians, and even private individuals.

The Space Shuttle Launch and Recovery Site Review Board, as it was known, was chaired by Floyd Thompson, a former director of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The Board got its start on 26 April 1971, when Dale Myers, NASA Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, charged it with determining whether any of the candidate sites could host a single new Shuttle launch and landing site as versatile as KSC and VAFB were together. The consolidation scheme aimed to trim Shuttle cost by eliminating redundancy." Read the full article here at Wired

New Homes For Space Shuttles- From NASA

 

 

2017 North American Bald Eagles Luncheon 

Images:  Jim Albaugh  James Kindelberger Graham    Mr. Graham receive NAA F-86 from Eric Simonsen      Ed Rusinek

James Kindelberger Graham, "Dutch" Kindelberger's grandson

Jim Albaugh , former Executive Vice President of The Boeing Company  

More Photos Here From 55th Anniversary of North American Aviation Bald Eagles

ALF Director Larry Latimer speaks to the Bald Eagles last meeting.

ALF Director Larry Latimer speaks to the Bald Eagles last meeting.

Sam Iacobellis

Sam Iacobellis

Memorial Tribute to Sam Iacobellis-

Sam Iacobellis was VP and Deputy Chairman of Rockwell International Corp. and the "Father of the B-1 Bomber"

You can’t pull a rabbit out of a hat unless you carefully put the rabbit in the hat beforehand.
— James Howard "Dutch" Kindelberger
"Formal posed portrait photograph of James H. Kindelberger, Chairman of the Board, North American Aviation, seated at desk, holding a pencil as if editing the business letter in front of him. Circular computer on desk at right. In the background can be seen a globe and desk models of North American fighter aircraft. Photo probably taken circa 1953, when Kindelberger was awarded the Collier Trophy for the development of the USAF North American F-100 Super Sabre supersonic aircraft." Courtesy- National Air and Space Museum - Smithsonian Institution

"Formal posed portrait photograph of James H. Kindelberger, Chairman of the Board, North American Aviation, seated at desk, holding a pencil as if editing the business letter in front of him. Circular computer on desk at right. In the background can be seen a globe and desk models of North American fighter aircraft. Photo probably taken circa 1953, when Kindelberger was awarded the Collier Trophy for the development of the USAF North American F-100 Super Sabre supersonic aircraft."

Courtesy- National Air and Space Museum - Smithsonian Institution

Lockheed Hypersonic Vehicle

 

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