Aerospace Legacy Foundation

Your portal to America's aerospace history

Aerospace Legacy Foundation (ALF) is a community based non-profit organization (501c3) including aerospace retirees and the public at large. Preserving Southern California's Aerospace and Aviation History including Downey's aerospace legacy.

Integrated Space Plan from Rockwell International 1989 v 1.1

Rockwell International Integrated Space Plan 1989 v 1.1 . Ronald M. Jones’ 1989 “Integrated Space Plan,” redrawn and color-coded by Nicolas Lee. Don’t like the palette? Download the vectors and design your own!

Rockwell International Integrated Space Plan 1989 v 1.1 . Ronald M. Jones’ 1989 “Integrated Space Plan,” redrawn and color-coded by Nicolas Lee. Don’t like the palette? Download the vectors and design your own!

Click here for the high resolution PDF of the Rockwell International Integrated Space Plan 

“Prepared during the 1980s by Rockwell International analyst Ron Jones. It charts a fantastic, inspirational vision for humanity’s future in outer space.

At the top appear historical events like “Voyager II Uranus Encounter” and “OV-105 Delivery;” at the bottom, ambitious future milestones like “Stationary Martian Skyhook” and “Interstellar Traversing World Ships.” The timeline spans roughly 100 years, from 1983 to 2100 AD.” More here...

 

Art by Stephan Martiniere Thousands of colonists might live on this interstellar Mayflower for a journey lasting generations. The ship has its own ecosystem and artificial gravity from its rotating cylindrical hull. A sister ship looms in the giant window.  

Art by Stephan Martiniere

Thousands of colonists might live on this interstellar Mayflower for a journey lasting generations. The ship has its own ecosystem and artificial gravity from its rotating cylindrical hull. A sister ship looms in the giant window.

 

Rockwell Integrated Space Plan. Click image to download. PDF

Rockwell Integrated Space Plan. Click image to download. PDF

"Wow! What’s really amazing about that chart, is that the technology and technical ingenuity it embodies and harnesses, hardware and software, focused on the many paths enabling the human expansion into space, also has enabled, along the way, a bevy or talented entrepreneurs and the government, to create and evolve a globally interactive environment, called the Internet, which, through the marvels of modern free market IT capabilities, has enabled the Makezine blog to initiate a discussion on the Integrated Space Plan (ISP) by a guy named Ragan and, within 24 hours, it can land on my computer desktop, the creator of the document in question…" Ron Jones, author of the "integrated space plan". From MakeZine

"For as long Jones could remember, he had spent his free time pondering the trajectory of space travel five, 30, 50, even 100 years down the cosmic road. By the time he got to his first job at Vandenberg, Jones had developed his own ideas about how and when humans would move permanently beyond Earth. To him, space travel was a cosmic Rube Goldberg machine. To reach the end goal—which he considered to be large-scale habitation of Mars—a thousand little things had to happen first. Things like creating reliable in-orbit transportation vehicles, mining asteroids for materials, and building a thriving community on the moon.

Jones was a young, space-obsessed engineer with too much time on his hands. “I was sitting back on this deserted beach, drinking beer, thinking about life and the space program,” he recalls. And then it hit him: The boxes and lines he was scrawling on the beach were more than just doodles; they were the beginning of the Integrated Space Plan, a wildly ambitious chart Jones would spend the next three decades developing.

The Integrated Space Plan recently got a modern-day overhaul by design firm 212Box (and is making its debut right here on WIRED). To really appreciate the new graphic, though, you have to understand the older version first....."

"Jones worked on the plan alone for months, until one day in the late ’80's he picked up Rockwell’s in-house newspaper and saw a story about a team called the Advanced Projects Group. It was conducting studies on lunar and Mars travel. They happened on the same floor, so Jones rolled up his poster, walked down the hall, and knocked on the door. The head of the team waved him in and asked what he wanted. “I told him I’d been working on a long-range plan for human expansion into space, and I’d seen the article in the paper and thought he was the guy to show it to,” Jones recalls."

Read the full article here at Wired

ron_jones_-_2045711.jpg

From "The Space Show" with Dr. David Livingston

 "Ron Jones is a partner and the Space Systems Lead in Integrated Space Analytics (ISA), recently created to update and automate the Integrated Space Plan. He is also the Marketing Director for BioSpace Experiments, Inc. (BSE), which provides low-cost, turn-key access to space for microgravity researchers. He was Deputy PM of the BSE’s (and ITA’s) CREST 1 and 2 experiment payload packages which successfully flew on back-to-back Space Shuttle missions STS-134 and STS-135 and the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. During the day, Mr. Jones works for the Boeing Company as their Product Lifecycle Management Legacy Engineering Office Lead which has responsibility for all engineering data from all of Boeing’s former/inactive programs. He was the Data Management Lead on Boeing’s Phantom Ray UAV (X-45C) team where he was responsible for the trade study that drove the selection of the NASA Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) to transport the Phantom Ray to Edwards AFB in California for flight testing, the first (and only) non-Shuttle use of the SCA. Prior to employment at Boeing, many remember Mr. Jones as Vice President and first Executive Director of Buzz Aldrin’s ShareSpace Foundation from ’98 to ’02. Before ShareSpace, he worked for 12 years on various aspects of the Space Shuttle program for Rockwell International and Martin Marietta. While in Rockwell’s Advanced Projects group in the late ’80’s – early ’90’s he worked IR&D relating to NASA’s Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). There he developed the Integrated Space Plan (ISP) which became an internationally recognized marketing tool of Rockwell’s Business Development organization. Prior to Martin Marietta, Mr. Jones worked at NASA/Ames Research Center where he was a member of the team that developed the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) telescope low-light level video acquisition and tracking system. He was a KAO flight crew member, R&D Technician and video and acquisition tracking system operator. As a NASA college intern, he conceived, designed, and developed the infrared telescope’s oscillating secondary mirror system."

Hear Ron Jones...

A 22nd-century dream: An unmanned probe powered by nuclear fusion explores a new solar system, after traveling several decades from Earth at 100 million miles an hour. Art by Stephan Martiniere

A 22nd-century dream: An unmanned probe powered by nuclear fusion explores a new solar system, after traveling several decades from Earth at 100 million miles an hour. Art by Stephan Martiniere

 

Journey To Mars

 NASA

NASA's Journey to Mars

NASA's Journey to Mars

Journey to Mars - NASA

Journey to Mars - NASA

Hubble view of star-forming region S106

Hubble view of star-forming region S106.jpg

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image. Credit: NASA & ESA

Earth-like planet that could host alien life has been discovered and it’s called Ross

Could Ross 128b be a match for Earth? 

Could Ross 128b be a match for Earth? 

"A planet the same size as Earth and with a similar temperature has been discovered.

Ross 128b was found orbiting a red dwarf 11 light years away from our own planet and is moving closer to us.

Scientists say its surface temperature may be ‘the closest known comfortable abode for possible life’.

Astronomers working with the European Southern Observatory’s High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) at the La Silla Observatory in Chile found that the red dwarf star Ross 128 is orbited by a low-mass ‘exoplanet’ every 9.9 days.

The Earth-sized world is expected to be temperate, with a surface temperature that may also be close to that of the Earth. Ross 128 is the ‘quietest’ nearby star to host such a temperate exoplanet."

 

Possible Life Beyond Earth? Ross

Possible Life Beyond Earth? Ross

Ross continued....

Study co-author, Dr Nicola Astudillo-Defru, of the University of Geneva in Switzerland, said: ‘This discovery is based on more than a decade of HARPS intensive monitoring together with state-of-the-art data reduction and analysis techniques.

‘Only HARPS has demonstrated such a precision and it remains the best planet hunter of its kind, 15 years after it began operations.’

Yahoo News

This 3,400-square-foot Mylar solar sail was tested in 2005 in a vacuum chamber at NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky

This 3,400-square-foot Mylar solar sail was tested in 2005 in a vacuum chamber at NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky

 

 

Boeing- Beyond Earth

Deep Space Gateway concepts revealed

http://collectSPACE.com — Boeing today (April 3, 2017) unveiled concepts for the deep space gateway and transport systems that could help achieve NASA's goal of having robust human space exploration from the Moon to Mars. Video credit: Boeing. Used with permission.

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Photonic Railway

 

Using Spacex BFR to rapidly and affordably build interplanetary photonic railway by the 2030s

"The full scale DE-STAR 4 (50-70 GW) will propel a wafer scale spacecraft with a 1 meter laser sail to about 26% the speed of light in about 10 minutes (20 kgo accel), reach Mars (1 AU) in 30 minutes, pass Voyager I in less than 3 days, pass 1,000 AU in 12 days and reach Alpha Centauri in about 20 years. The same directed energy driver (DE-STAR 4) can also propel a 100 kg payload to about 2% c and a 10,000 kg payload to more than 1,000 km/s. While such missions would be truly remarkable, the system is scalable to any level of power and array size where the tradeoff is between the desired mass and speed of the spacecraft." Read the article...

If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.
— William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
Image- Boeing

Image- Boeing

Boeing Deep Space Gateway

"Deep space gateway, transport critical to future human space activities"

Article from NASA March 28 2017

Deep Space Gateway to Open Opportunities for Distant Destinations

NASA is leading the next steps into deep space near the moon, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems needed for challenging missions to deep space destinations including Mars. The area of space near the moon offers a true deep space environment to gain experience for human missions that push farther into the solar system, access the lunar surface for robotic missions but with the ability to return to Earth if needed in days rather than weeks or months.

 

The period of exploration in the vicinity of the moon will begin with the first integrated mission of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft, and will continue as we explore further. NASA aims to begin a cadence of one flight per year after the second mission, and the agency has established an initial set of integrated human exploration objectives combining the efforts aboard the International Space Station, SLS and Orion, and other capabilities needed to support human missions to explore deep space. 

 

Flight hardware for SLS and Orion is currently in production for the first and second missions, life support and related technologies are being tested on ISS, and habitation and propulsion development activities are also underway. NASA is working with domestic and international partners to solve the great challenges of deep space exploration. Missions in the vicinity of the moon will span multiple phases as part of NASA’s framework to build a flexible, reusable and sustainable infrastructure that will last multiple decades and support missions of increasing complexity.

 

Deep Space Gateway

This first phase of exploration near the moon will use current technologies and allow us to gain experience with extended operations farther from Earth than previously completed. These missions enable NASA to develop new techniques and apply innovative approaches to solving problems in preparation for longer-duration missions far from Earth.

 

In addition to demonstrating the safe operation of the integrated SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft, the agency is also looking to build a crew tended spaceport in lunar orbit within the first few missions that would serve as a gateway to deep space and the lunar surface. This deep space gateway would have a power bus, a small habitat to extend crew time, docking capability, an airlock, and serviced by logistics modules to enable research. The propulsion system on the gateway mainly uses high power electric propulsion for station keeping and the ability to transfer among a family of orbits in the lunar vicinity. The three primary elements of the gateway, the power and propulsion bus and habitat module, and a small logistics module(s), would take advantage of the cargo capacity of SLS and crewed deep space capability of Orion. An airlock can further augment the capabilities of the gateway and can fly on a subsequent exploration mission, Building the deep space gateway will allow engineers to develop new skills and test new technologies that have evolved since the assembly of the International Space Station. The gateway will be developed, serviced, and utilized in collaboration with commercial and international partners." Article continues here...

Boeing- Concepts for Deep Space Gateway

Boeing- Concepts for Deep Space Gateway

Deep Space- NASA    

Deep Space- NASA

 

 

May 18, 2016

NASA Invites Media, Social Media to June Deep Space Rocket Booster Test

A test version of the booster for NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System, will fire up for the second of two qualification ground tests June 28 at prime contractor Orbital ATK's test facility in Promontory, Utah. The test will provide NASA with critical data to support booster qualification for flight. When completed, two five-segment boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power the world's most powerful rocket, with the Orion spacecraft atop, to achieve human exploration to deep-space destinations, including our journey to Mars. Credits: Orbital ATK

A test version of the booster for NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System, will fire up for the second of two qualification ground tests June 28 at prime contractor Orbital ATK's test facility in Promontory, Utah. The test will provide NASA with critical data to support booster qualification for flight. When completed, two five-segment boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power the world's most powerful rocket, with the Orion spacecraft atop, to achieve human exploration to deep-space destinations, including our journey to Mars.

Credits: Orbital ATK

NASA Completes Review of First SLS, Orion Deep Space Exploration Mission

NASA is providing an update on the first integrated launch of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft after completing a comprehensive review of the launch schedule.
 
This uncrewed mission, known as Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) is a critical flight test for the agency’s human deep space exploration goals. EM-1 lays the foundation for the first crewed flight of SLS and Orion, as well as a regular cadence of missions thereafter near the Moon and beyond.
 
The review follows an earlier assessment where NASA evaluated the cost, risk and technical factors of adding crew to the mission, but ultimately affirmed the original plan to fly EM-1 uncrewed. NASA initiated this review as a result of the crew study and challenges related to building the core stage of the world’s most powerful rocket for the first time, issues with manufacturing and supplying Orion’s first European service module, and tornado damage at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
 
“While the review of the possible manufacturing and production schedule risks indicate a launch date of June 2020, the agency is managing to December 2019,” said acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot. “Since several of the key risks identified have not been actually realized, we are able to put in place mitigation strategies for those risks to protect the December 2019 date.”
 
The majority of work on NASA’s new deep space exploration systems is on track. The agency is using lessons learned from first time builds to drive efficiencies into overall production and operations planning. To address schedule risks identified in the review, NASA established new production performance milestones for the SLS core stage to increase confidence for future hardware builds. NASA and its contractors are supporting ESA’s (European Space Agency) efforts to optimize build plans for schedule flexibility if sub-contractor deliveries for the service module are late.
 
NASA’s ability to meet its agency baseline commitments to EM-1 cost, which includes SLS and ground systems, currently remains within original targets. The costs for EM-1 up to a possible June 2020 launch date remain within the 15 percent limit for SLS and are slightly above for ground systems. NASA’s cost commitment for Orion is through Exploration Mission-2. With NASA’s multi-mission approach to deep space exploration, the agency has hardware in production for the first and second missions, and is gearing up for the third flight. When teams complete hardware for one flight, they’re moving on to the next.
 
As part of the review, NASA now plans to accelerate a test of Orion’s launch abort system ahead of EM-1, and is targeting April 2019. Known as Ascent-Abort 2, the test will validate the launch abort system’s ability to get crew to safety if needed during ascent. Moving up the test date ahead of EM-1 will reduce risk for the first flight with crew, which remains on track for 2023.
 
Technology Advancements

On both the rocket and spacecraft, NASA is using advanced manufacturing techniques that have helped to position the nation and U.S. companies as world leaders in this area. For example, NASA is using additive manufacturing (3-D printing) on more than 100 parts of Orion. While building the two largest core stage structures of the rocket, NASA welded the thickest structures ever joined using self-reacting friction stir welding.
 
SLS has completed welding on all the major structures for the mission and is on track to assemble them to form the largest rocket stage ever built and complete the EM-1 “green run,” an engine test that will fire up the core stage with all four RS-25 engines at the same time.
 
NASA is reusing avionics boxes from the Orion EM-1 crew module for the next flight. Avionics and electrical systems provide the “nervous system” of launch vehicles and spacecraft, linking diverse systems into a functioning whole.
 
For ground systems, infrastructure at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is intended to support the exploration systems including launch, flight and recovery operations. The center will be able to accommodate the evolving needs of SLS, Orion, and the rockets and spacecraft of commercial partners for more flexible, affordable, and responsive national launch capabilities.
 
EM-1 will demonstrate safe operations of the integrated SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft, and the agency currently is studying a deep space gateway concept with U.S. industry and space station partners for potential future missions near the Moon.
 
“Hardware progress continues every day for the early flights of SLS and Orion. EM-1 will mark a significant achievement for NASA, and our nation’s future of human deep space exploration,” said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate in Washington. “Our investments in SLS and Orion will take us to the Moon and beyond, advancing American leadership in space.”

Last Updated: Nov. 9, 2017

Editor: Sarah Loff

Tags:  Ground SystemsJourney to MarsOrion SpacecraftSpace Launch System

 

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